Leaving the 99 for the 1…

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“If I asked you to watch my flock of 100 sheep for the weekend and one wandered off, I would want you to stay with the flock. Don’t risk losing the whole flock for one lost sheep. I would be sad that one got lost, but I would be very thankful that 99% of my flock was still safe and sound. But Jesus doesn’t see it this way. In the Lord’s economy, seeking and finding one dying sheep, lost and ensnared in the far reaches of the frontier, produces more joy than protecting the 99 who are living safely in the sheepfold. Valuation in the Kingdom of God can be confounding. So let me say again: seeking one lost sheep ultimately produces more heavenly joy than protecting 99 sheep who are not lost. (For what it’s worth, I believe the 99 sheep are safe and sound in the sheep pen.)

Here’s where it gets really challenging. If you apply this same line of reasoning to UPG (Unreached People group) statistics, it becomes a gut-punch. How much more should we feel the burden when we realize that not one, but billions are lost in the frontier of unreached people groups? But only a single penny out of every missions dollar is spent to reach these lost sheep. Only a handful of shepherds are searching for them.Yet we spend untold billions of dollars building bigger and better sheep pens for people who are bored with the Gospel. We want to be the ones who live like Jesus and make costly decisions to do holy things. But these cold, hard statistics are a cold, hard betrayal of our perverted priorities. If we’re honest, we are the ones He is so lovingly chastising in Luke 15. For us to faithfully live into the mandate to make disciples of all nations, we have to actually spend our time, money, and manpower going to these places that are completely unreached. We have to go to the frontier. We have to care. We have to prioritize these unreached people with our intercession, time, and money. So we must go to them. To them, it’s just home. To us…it’s the frontier.”
Jeff Henderson
PILGRIM VOL. II

 

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Revival in Western Nuba Mountains

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In the YouTube video below I interview  three brothers from the Republic of (North) Sudan about the Lord’s work in their homeland. I do believe the country   is  in the beginning stages of many coming to Christ alone for salvation …please pray!

We finished our 10 day training on July 24th with these young men as well as others from both the Republic of (North) Sudan and South Sudan, along one friend from Yumbe District and Pastor Tobious from the Metu Mountains. They stayed with us at RAU and the training was done in the RAU Hall of Tyrannus. Because of generous gifts of God’s people we are able to transport them from and  back to their various refugee encampments, as well as feed and house them. Thank you to those who support and pray for Reaching Africa’s Unreached!
Pastor Jason Andrew Van Bemmel and Bob Brown did an excellent job covering both Church History and Systematic Theology, which is  Modules 4 & 5  of Reaching and Teaching International’s 9 Module curriculum. We also had one day of training on “Farming As a Business” with practicals in the RAU demo plot with RAU’s Agricultural specialist, Prince Apiku Emma.  Carol also gave a lesson on signs of Ebola as well as practical instructions of prevention. 


It is a joy to partner with Reaching and Teaching as well as Forest Hill Presbyterian (PCA) Church and Rocky Point Baptist Church in walking out 2 Timothy 2:2. Rocky Point Baptist was with us in June with Module 3: Hermeneutics.
It is also a joy to be able to give out biblically sound Arabic books given through the Gospel Coalition International Outreach and the specific books related to Church History and Systematic Theology from Jason and Bob.


Jason and Bob left for Maryland on the 25th. Carol and I miss them and are very grateful for their coming as well as  for their families ,Forest Hill Presbyterian Church, and New Covenant Presbyterian Church , who sacrificially sent them off! 

Thank you to the MANY who through prayer, financial partnership, encouragement, physical presence and loving gifts are very much a part of RAU.  We could not do what we do without your action.  We are, as we have often said, a conduit of the grace of God flowing through you to the precious ones He means to bless and strengthen and equip for great and mighty things.

  Pray for safety and strength and endurance and health.  Pray the fruit that lasts would be produced in our lives and in the lives of those we love and serve.

Thank you and God Bless you,

Carol (Jacob) Lee

August Carol me

Tax deductible  charitable donations may  be made via PayPal or check.  PayPal also has a way to make reoccurring monthly gifts. Reoccurring monthly gifts are very helpful to the ministry. To do so, please click on the PayPal link below. PayPal deducts  a small amount from each gift as a processing fee. All gifts given through PayPal and by check are tax deductible as Reaching Africa’s Unreached has 501c3 tax exempt status as a charitable organization.  If you wish to write a check you may write it out to R.A.U.and mail it to Lifegate Missions, 395 Lifegate Ln., Seguin Texas 78155.

 

Go to RAU’s Facebook page for up to date reports, pictures, musings, and exhortations:
RAU was recently registered with Amazon as a non-profit organization to which a percentage may be donated for every dollar you spend there.  Here is the link if you are interested:
For those who have asked, small packages and letters may safely be sent to:
Jacob & Carol Lee, PO. 55, Moyo Uganda, East Africa
The greatest evil is having the gospel and not doing everything within our power to get it to those who do not have it!
 ———–
 When at least 35% of the world, “the unoccupied fields”, have no access to the gospel, we (believers) must all do all we can to reach them. We who are saved owe the gospel to every lost person, most especially the 2.4 billion who will not hear unless someone breaks into their “unoccupied field” with no thought of their own life!
 —————-
 Sowing seeds of love and kindness should not be separated from preaching the gospel of sovereign grace but completely intertwined with it!
 —————-
 I am sure that none of us will say when in heaven that we prayed too much, we sacrificed too much, proclaimed the gospel too much, and were too passionate to get the gospel to those who have little to no access to this gospel of grace. Let us together press on to make it our  ambition to preach the gospel where Christ has not been named!
—————
Our goal in our gospel witness is to take our eyes off the “risk” and place them on the cause for the risk. When God compels us like this he often will not tell us the risks…after all there are no risks for the all-knowing, all-powerful God. So let us be AMBITIOUS (Romans 15:20) to see that ALL are reached with the gospel of grace (Romans 1:16) in ALL places…there are no closed doors to the gospel, just some which are more difficult to go through!
 Jacob Lee

Always Be Prepared

Always Be Prepared

By Carol Lee

“…but in your hearts honor Christ the Lord as holy, always being prepared to make a defense to anyone who asks you for a reason for the hope that is in you; yet do it with gentleness and respect,

1 Peter 3:15

For when the foolish took their lamps, they took no oil with them, but the wise took flasks of oil with their lamps.

Matthew 25:3-4

“If you believe you can accomplish everything by “cramming” at the eleventh hour, by all means, don’t lift a finger now. But you may think twice about beginning to build your ark once it has already started raining”
 Max Brooks

“When opportunity comes, it’s too late to prepare.”
 John Wooden

Most people fail in life because they were not prepared for the opportunities when they appeared.
 Orrin Woodward

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Recently, during one of my language lessons, we were reading Ma’di parables and came across one that carries the same meaning as the above quotes.  “Mvuka li aci andra kpe!” (“In vain you cut (make) your shoes right before the fire”.)  As I was doing my creative brainstorming for this newsletter, what was distilled in my thinking is that the few months since we have been back here at RAU have been this sort of preparation in many areas of the ministry.  Times of preparation can seem barren of meaningful activity or effective ministry, but being ready for the “sudden” floodgate of opportunities makes you glad that you did the needful groundwork.

With the “start & finish line” in mind, Jacob painstakingly oversaw the last stages of the new Missionary House Duplex and, before that, the completion of the expanded Hall of Tyrannus, ensuring that the final product was pleasing to the eye and functional for many generations.  [Building in this remote region is not easy as tools and supplies are not easily acquired.  Every step is very very labor-intensive!]  Our goal was to have at least “our side” of the Duplex ready to move into before the team (from Rocky Point Baptist Church Stephenville Texas) arrived for our North and South Sudanese leaders’ retreat.  Jacob and I had been looking forward to being settled into our (new) home so that as we approached a very busy season of ministry we would have a haven of rest and feel more prepared. We did move in with only a day or two to spare before the arrival of the Rocky Point ministry team—not as ready as we would have liked to have been, but moved in!

What initially inspired the new building was the vision of having other families come and share the load, the joy of the work of the various branches of RAU ministry and most importantly having a team to pass the baton on to when the Lord takes us home to glory. At the writing of this newsletter, “our side” is complete minus a few small issues.  Our expert carpenters, Nkata and Lawrence, returned home for a short break to see their families and rest a bit, after which they will return to finish up the other side of the Duplex and put the finishing touches on our home.  Then we will be fully ready for the ones the Lord has in mind to come and share the load.

Another area of intensive labor and preparation has been our 20 acre Agricultural Demo Farm.  March and April are typically the busiest as ground is made ready for planting and then the planting and weeding are done. This year, 2019, much like 2017, had an extended dry season.  Meteorologists were saying we should anticipate famine for northern Uganda among other areas of Uganda and neighboring countries.  Climbing prices of staple food items in the market are already indicating food scarcity.  There were reports that both host community members as well as refugees in the near by settlements in our area will not have enough food to sustain them well due to the lack of a timely and adequate rainy season.  Tobious, Pastor of Aya Baptist Church in the Metu Mountains, also wrote that the rains seriously delayed to come in sufficient quantity for timely planting in some of the mountain communities where he lives and works.  Thankfully, since then, the rains have come and farmers are planting.

In response to this information of potential food shortage, RAU has been preparing in several ways.  We are continuing to nurture our banana and mango trees (bananas produce suckers which we sell for a significantly reduced price and the mango seedlings will be grafted for sale as well).  Meanwhile we are inter-cropping between fruit tree lines with a Rosette-resistant variety of ground nuts (peanuts) — Serenut 14R.  In the past, the local community has experienced > 50% loss of production using the local variety of g-nut.  The plan in buying and planting improved varieties of various crops is to multiply seed so that churches and the community can benefit by purchasing improved seed (with increased production) at greatly reduced prices in order to boost their production for sale and consumption.  To add to the Cassava (an improved variety which is ready for consumption in 6 months vs the 12-18 months of other varieties) that we harvested, RAU purchased millet from a local farmer that can be ground along with the Cassava for an emergency, nutritional food source. Our vegetable seedling beds have been filled and re-filled as we plant some vegetables for demo and our own consumption and also for selling affordable seedlings to community members for their gardens.

Apiku Emma, our Principal Agricultural Extension Officer (PAEO) is continuing to oversee the demo farm operations and challenge and inspire the local communities on the radio every Thursday evening to see farming as a potential business rather than mere subsistence activity. Recently, Uganda’s President Museveni visited Moyo (as well as other West Nile towns and cities) and charged the citizens to focus on farming for improved livelihood. It was an opportunity to underscore that evening on the radio the Thursday he was in Moyo what RAU has already been doing for the last 3 years since adding an Agricultural component to the ministry: improved farming techniques and technology, farming as a business, and timely extension consultancy.  As a response to a need in the community for recommended seed, agro-chemicals and tools and equipment, Emma and his wife, Vivian, started their own business called Apiviva Agrotechno Consult and Supplies, Ltd.  As you can imagine, Emma is even busier now as he offers on the spot consultation for farming questions at their shop, in addition to the sale of reliable inputs and equipment. He is also bringing new technology to RAU so that it can be demonstrated for local farmers and increase our own production.

As the RAU team has done its work of preparation, God has been gracious to do His part of sending rain which has, once again, brought life and lushness to the RAU campus.  It’s always a stunning sight to see the fertile beauty that is characteristic of “The Pearl of Africa”—Uganda. We are very grateful for Missionary Agricultural Resource Services (M.A.R.S.) which partners with us in agricultural ministry endeavors! They help to keep us afloat in our agricultural endeavors and moving forward!

Just in the nick of time, our prep goals were met (mostly) and then it was “hit the ground running” for the season of ministry for which we had been preparing

Due to the size of the team, the Rocky Point team was able to fly directly into Moyo’s grass strip on Monday, June 17th, which cut off a good 6-8 hours of extra travel and many potholes!  It gave them a little time to unwind before the retreat started the next day—except for the ladies, Lura and Marty—they got to experience the famous Boda ride in to town and the fun shopping and market experience.  Hmmm…I think they weren’t too eager to repeat it! Hahaha!

At the time of the retreat, we were blessed to have visiting us our friend and brother, Misengile Samuel, from DRC, who was a great help and a joy to be around!

The Rocky Point Team came well prepared to teach and serve.  By 9 a.m. Tuesday morning, we had already received our first Retreat attendees. Thanks to Lura and Marty, the registration process was like a well-oiled machine. As members arrived from various Refugee settlements (Rhino Camp, Morobi, Palorinya, Bidi Bidi and others), they were registered and settled into one of six tukalus or Lydia’s house.  After refreshing themselves with a bath and lunch they were ready to start the first session of Module 3 (Hermeneutics—Heads, Church Ordinances —Hands, Several Fruits of the Spirit —Heart) of Reaching and Teaching’s 9 Module Curriculum entitled, “Head, Hands and Heart.”  Rocky Point sent 4 excellent teachers to cover the topics. This was a blessing that allowed Jacob the freedom to continue with administrative and managerial duties.  Each module is organized as 5 days or 40 hour of teaching. During the week there was an afternoon session on “Farming As A Business”.  The teaching team was also able to bring valuable resources in Arabic from “The Gospel Coalition International Outreach”.  Jacob loves the idea that the written word is a teacher–a missionary that never grows weary and spans through the generations.

Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers.
― Charles W. Eliot

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The benefit of having the attendees here at RAU is that sessions  can start on time and include an evening session as well. The Lord has blessed so that we have the beds for both the attendees and trainers, as well as the ability to feed and transport the men from their various refugee settlements. All of us ladies (in the kitchen as well as Lura, Marty and I) ensured that the men were well-fed and their needs cared for.  The retreat started Tuesday morning and ended Saturday at noon.  It’s amazing how quickly bonded people become when such a compressed and intense is spent together!  [On July 15th-24th, the same group of men will return for Modules 4 & 5 (Church History and Systematic Theology) with Jason Van Bemmel (Forest Hill Presbyterian Church (PCA)) and Bob Brown teaching.]

On Sunday we traveled to Obongi to visit and encourage Pastor Godfrey and Obongi Town Church.  Recently, money had been provided for them by a lovely family to build a semi-permanent structure that could protect them from some of the elements.  On behalf of the church, Godfrey expressed such gratefulness for this blessing that kept them from being rained on, chased from tree to tree or being beaten down by the sun.  Most of us would just not go to church if we were presented with these same conditions on Sunday. Special thanks to the family who had a burden for this dear gathering of brothers and sisters.

Monday was “a day off”—which was anything BUT! Jacob had every single guy using every single talent they had to fix every possible problem (plumbing, electrical, solar, mechanical, IT and internet issues)! And I had recruited Marty and Lura to do some re-organizing projects.  They were all such a blessing and what was accomplished will make our lives considerably easier after they have returned to the USA.

Tuesday and Wednesday were slated to be Metu Mountain “white-knuckle mission adventures.”  However, on Tuesday, the Land Cruiser developed a clutch problem which could not be resolved in time for the team to go the Gbari/Arapi/Duku/Oyo side of the mountains, much to the disappointment of everyone.  Tobious made a special trip the churches there by boda to explain to all the dear ones waiting and to cheer them as much as possible.

By 11 a.m. the next morning (Wednesday) the Land Cruiser seemed to be in shape to try the most strenuous of the remote journeys — to Aya, Ijujo and Cinyi.  This trip is the ultimate test for a Land Cruiser, not only the mechanical parts but the tires as well. It took a while to make it up the short-cut road as the rain had washed some very large ruts in the road which required all hands on deck to fill the ruts with stones and sand.  There were some very happy people waiting on the other end and it was a joy and blessing for Jacob and the Rocky Point team as well.  The team was able to make it safely back to RAU! Very literally, Jacob pulled the vehicle into the garage and the transmission gave out completely! The Land Cruiser apparently was making a bold statement that “Enough is enough!”  Thankfully, since then, the Land Cruiser has received some tender loving care through the loving care of dear friends back home who have contributed towards some of the repairs.

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Jacob ensuring that everyone tries a little Kalo!

A full and tiring schedule did not keep us from enjoying a few nights of movies with BUTTERED POPCORN!!!  The laughter and time spent together was medicine for our souls!

Then…just like that, time was up and the team flew off into the horizon (again, from Moyo)!  [We are always amazed at what a fast “race” it is to the finish line—once that starter gun goes off — the race is over in a flash!] The goodbyes were hard!  The retreat attendees endeared themselves to us and, of course, the Rocky Point team is like family.  There was a gaping hole left by the team’s absence. 

In full throttle of preparing for moving into the house and being ready for the retreat, we experienced the grace and kindness of the Lord several times.  First, a couple weeks before, Jacob was trying to help get some pieces of wood out of storage and the thing on which he was standing seemed almost to shoot out from under him (as if someone had yanked it out) and he was thrown backward and downward onto the harrow where his back hit a metal bar, missing his spine by an inch.  Though the pain he experienced was excruciating and caused him to pass out (scaring the tar out of me, by the way), the physical and visible damage was miraculously disproportionate to the intense pain and the probability of serious injury or worse.  We could only conclude that the Lord spared him and has more for him to do. A week or so later, Jacob started experiencing typical malaria symptoms and because the pressure to get things done was so great, we immediately started him on an anti-malarial drug. This, I believe, decreased the duration of his symptoms so he could do what was needful, though the malaria slowed him down and he was forced to take periods of rest.  These events were reminders that the Lord has numbered our days AND He is gracious even when we underestimate the limits of our capacities!

The “space” between the last retreat and the next has been full of activity.  Jacob has continued to press on with details (everyone around here will attest to the fact that there is NEVER a time when work is finished. No small problem goes unnoticed by Jacob’s keen eye).

Our Ag projects are booming! Every kind of vegetable for demo and consumption has been planted (tomatoes, cabbage, onions, okra, squash, cucumber, air potatoes, carrots, watermelon and others).   The Rosette-resistant g-nuts (peanuts) are doing very well.  Emma has introduce various technologies for inspiring farmers to try new methods and improve their production (grow bags, seedling trays, spray pumps, improved variety seeds).  Our grafted mangoes did very well this year (and we can only expect it to get better, especially if we are diligent to control the fruit fly population, which is what spoils mangoes) and we were able to find a ready market for them.  We are no where near break-even in terms of revenue, but every little bit helps to off-set the cost of managing the various crops.  Banana suckers have been sold in great numbers as community members have seen how well bananas of several varieties can be grown in this region. We have been selling Namche 5 Upland rice and other seeds which have been multiplied.  Ag knowledge and inputs have also been made available to the Refugee community.  We are glad to be a part of the many groups who want to bring hope and opportunity for improved livelihood for our local communities, no matter where they come from. 

Each retreat (this last one hosted 37 members of the Refugee community) Module has a portion of time set aside for Ag training with an emphasis on Farming as a Business. In addition, this last week, we were honored to host 50 students from an Ag Club within the Palorinya refugee settlement.  Jacob took some time at the beginning to implant in them our theme: 2 Timothy 2:2 and the principal of multiplication through knowledge sharing and discipleship.  Then, Emma took them around the demo farm, teaching and showing as they went.  The significance was not lost on us that these young people will be the architects of their newly-formed country when peace has been secured and the re-building can start in earnest.

Two other very significant events have happened in the past month. Two of our RAU-Uganda board members achieved noteworthy milestones.  They have both been a tremendous blessing to the ministry of RAU and we thank God for them and bless them both in Jesus’ Name!

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Pastor Patrick Bukenya finished his Westminster seminary coursework and was officially ordained in the Presbyterian Church of Uganda.  We were blessed to attend the very unique church service in which previous pastors, including the very first one, were present.  It was a celebrated point of interest in the church service that a leader within a church could pass the baton on to the “Timothy’s” and “Tituses” of the next generation of leaders willingly through the process of mentorship and training.

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We are also happy and proud to announce the graduation of Nurse Nyombi Samuel, RN with his BSN.  It was a long and strenuous run for him.  This accomplishment has great implications for him and the medical field is blessed to have a skilled, compassionate and upstanding young man among its ranks.  Unfortunately, we were unable to attend the graduation ceremony.  It would have been an honor to celebrate with him.  We are confident that the Lord has something special in store for him.

As I read and re-read what I have written, I am struck by how much has happened—and yet—how much more needs to be done.  In Jacob’s and my prayers this morning were mentioned all the different areas where grace-endowed efforts need to continue or to be started.  There was that sense of so much to do and so little time and of being stretched thin. We have received emails requesting trainings to empower youth and other believers in Yumbe to effectively, lovingly and sensitively engage with their Muslim neighbors in sharing the message that is central to our life and hope as Christians. There are still villages in the mountains where no church exists. More and more young men from Uganda, South Sudan, and North Sudan are desirous of biblical training. Their hearts are to plant churches in their unreached tribes and villages. The needs and opportunities to bring about growth (spiritual, socio-economic, personal) seem insurmountable!  However, our trust is in the Lord of the Harvest. He commands us to pray to Him to THRUST out laborers.  And that is what we are doing. We pray that many more of you will be among those whom the Lord thrusts into the ripe harvest fields all over the world. 

For this is what the Lord has commanded us:
“I have made you
a light for the Gentiles
to bring salvation
to the end of the earth.”
When the Gentiles heard this, they rejoiced and honored the word of the Lord, and all who had been appointed to eternal life believed.” (Acts 13:47-48)…”…I (Jesus) am sending you (Paul/true for all Christ’s disciples) to them (the lost) to open their eyes so that they may turn from darkness to light and from the power of Satan to God, that they may receive forgiveness of sins and a share among those who are sanctified by faith in me(Jesus).” (Acts 26:17-18)
Let us NEVER FORGET that a solid third of the world still sits in darkness, with little or no access to even hear the gospel message (there are roughly 2.9 billion unreached people groups –>”nations”,scattered across about 7,000 people groups). Pray for the light of gospel to reach these who are in darkness and for those who are seeking to shine Jesus, the light, out to them.
In the midst of our prayer let us actively be involved in reaching our neighbors who are without Christ’s forgiveness!

Jacob Lee

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The Hall of Tyrannus (at night)

We also believe in the principal of multiplication that is mandated and demonstrated in scripture.  Our belief and hope is that what we are teaching to faithful people here is being taught to other faithful people who will teach others ==> 2 Timothy 2:2.  That’s the way the Kingdom of Christ has expanded in the past.  That’s how capacity building has made its impact on cultures and communities.  That’s how it will continue to happen. Our goal is not to create dependency on us or what we have to offer but to equip and inspire the ones we came to serve to develop their own God-given capacity to know and grow and then to spread what they know so that change is real and measurable and contagious!

As we pray, prepare (by work and rest) and press on, we also urge and exhort you who read this (as we constantly exhort ourselves and feel the pinch of conscience) to set Christ-glorifying, Gospel priorities.  Jacob posted this on the RAU Facebook page  by D.A. Carson: “Put the advance of the gospel at the center of your aspirations.”  In order to “be ready” we have to believe that there is something worthy and requires our “getting ready”.  The emphasis of this newsletter is “being prepared for what lies ahead” and not missing out on opportunities because of a lack of preparation. We will miss out on better things if, as C.S. Lewis says, we behave “like an ignorant child who wants to go on making mud pies in a slum because he cannot imagine what is meant by the offer of a holiday at the sea.” Our focus needs shifting and clarity so we will not be taken off guard when we are called to account in one way or another. I recently heard a song by Jonathan McReynolds entitled, “Make Room”.  It starts out with these words:  “I find space for what I treasure; I make time for what I want.  I choose my priorities and, Jesus, You’re my Number One.”  We pray that Jesus and His plans will be your Number One–and ours!!  Always be preparing so that, when opportunity arises, you will be prepared!

Thank you to the MANY who through prayer, financial partnership, encouragement, physical presence and loving gifts are very much a part of RAU.  We could not do what we do without your action.  We are, as we have often said, a conduit of the grace of God flowing through you to the precious ones He means to bless and strengthen and equip for great and mighty things.

Continue to pray for the upcoming retreat of back-to-back modules.  Pray for safety and strength and endurance and health.  Pray the fruit that lasts would be produced in our lives and in the lives of those we love and serve.

Thank you and God Bless you,

Carol (Jacob) Lee

August Carol me

Tax deductible  charitable donations may  be made via PayPal or check.  PayPal also has a way to make reoccurring monthly gifts. Reoccurring monthly gifts are very helpful to the ministry. To do so, please click on the PayPal link below. PayPal deducts  a small amount from each gift as a processing fee. All gifts given through PayPal and by check are tax deductible as Reaching Africa’s Unreached has 501c3 tax exempt status as a charitable organization.  If you wish to write a check you may write it out to R.A.U.and mail it to Lifegate Missions, 395 Lifegate Ln., Seguin Texas 78155.

 

Go to RAU’s Facebook page for up to date reports, pictures, musings, and exhortations:
RAU was recently registered with Amazon as a non-profit organization to which a percentage may be donated for every dollar you spend there.  Here is the link if you are interested:
For those who have asked, small packages and letters may safely be sent to:
Jacob & Carol Lee, PO. 55, Moyo Uganda, East Africa
The greatest evil is having the gospel and not doing everything within our power to get it to those who do not have it!
 ———–
 When at least 35% of the world, “the unoccupied fields”, have no access to the gospel, we (believers) must all do all we can to reach them. We who are saved owe the gospel to every lost person, most especially the 2.4 billion who will not hear unless someone breaks into their “unoccupied field” with no thought of their own life!
 —————-
 Sowing seeds of love and kindness should not be separated from preaching the gospel of sovereign grace but completely intertwined with it!
 —————-
 I am sure that none of us will say when in heaven that we prayed too much, we sacrificed too much, proclaimed the gospel too much, and were too passionate to get the gospel to those who have little to no access to this gospel of grace. Let us together press on to make it our  ambition to preach the gospel where Christ has not been named!
—————
Our goal in our gospel witness is to take our eyes off the “risk” and place them on the cause for the risk. When God compels us like this he often will not tell us the risks…after all there are no risks for the all-knowing, all-powerful God. So let us be AMBITIOUS (Romans 15:20) to see that ALL are reached with the gospel of grace (Romans 1:16) in ALL places…there are no closed doors to the gospel, just some which are more difficult to go through!
 Jacob Lee

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Every Good Work

Every Good Work

By Carol Lee

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And the Lord God planted a garden in Eden, in the east, and there he put the man whom he had formed.

Genesis 2:8

God blessed them, and God said to them, “Be fruitful, multiply, fill the earth, and subdue it. Rule the fish of the sea, the birds of the sky, and every creature that crawls on the earth.

Genesis 1:28

For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared ahead of time for us to do.

Ephesians 2:10

When we work, we are, as those in the Lutheran tradition often put it, the “fingers of God,” the agents of his providential love for others. This understanding elevates the purpose of work from making a living to loving our neighbor and at the same time releases us from the crushing burden of working primarily to prove ourselves….

“But in Genesis we see God as a gardener, and in the New Testament we see him as a carpenter. No task is too small a vessel to hold the immense dignity of work given by God. Simple physical labor is God’s work no less than the formulation of theological truth. Think of the supposedly menial work of housecleaning. Consider that if you do not do it—or hire someone else to do it—you will eventually get sick and die from the germs, viruses, and infections that will breed in your home. The material creation was made by God to be developed, cultivated, and cared for in an endless number of ways through human labor. But even the simplest of these ways is important. Without them all, human life cannot flourish.

From “Every Good Endeavor”

~~Timothy Keller~~

In past and present humans have attempted to sort work into hierarchical importance or deem some work “spiritual” and other work “profane or secular.”  Timothy Keller, in his book, “Every Good Endeavor,” has made a good case for all work being the reflection of God’s ethic and design.  The need and desire for meaningful work is imprinted into our nature which is made in God’s image.  Every manner of work which is not contrary to God’s moral law is valuable and valid.

This is a reassuring thought for us at Reaching Africa’s Unreached (RAU) because if we accepted the prototype of “spiritual vs mundane/secular” work, much of what we have been doing these past few months might be considered outside the scope of a Christian ministry.  These days, since returning from the USA, have been filled with sweat and energy related to building a house and planting crops and shopping for supplies and many other repetitive, “normal” activities of everyday life.  We rest in the truth that ALL we do here is for the glory of God and the good of our neighbors and fulfills the Lord’s overarching, sovereign plan for us.

Jacob put “the pedal to the metal“, went full steam ahead to finish the expansion of the Hall of Tyrannus  until complete (we can now comfortably seat 45 if so desired) and, now, is working on the Mission Duplex so we can move there and make things ready for guests and partners who come alongside us.  It is what needs to get done to be ready for upcoming ministry events. The house is in the finishing stages which requires Jacob’s constant oversight and direction.  Construction in rural Northern Uganda is not an easy task — there are no ‘Home Depots‘ to run to when a supplies or tools are needed.  To ‘re-do‘ something means chiseling through concrete or explaining a new way of doing a particular job — change is hard! Both of us will be relieved and  thrilled to enjoy the fruit of Jacob’s labor (and that of the very competent builders, of course) very soon!

While the building has been going on, rainy season started.  This means that the ground had to be plowed and ground nut seed peeled and readied for planting. Twenty acres of former bush-land required a lot of “subduing” to make the land fully productive and beautiful.  This required foresight and planning and the hiring and overseeing of community members to do the labor-intensive work of planting.  The grafted mangoes have done beautifully this year because of the phermone traps which controlled the fruit fly population (notorious for ruining perfectly good fruit.)  We have had steady customers coming to buy the mangoes for resale in town — which had been our goal from the beginning.  Seed beds were started so that vegetables can be planted and seedlings sold.  Emma is continuing on with the Ag radio program. We are very grateful for M.A.R.S. partnership in our agricultural endeavors.  Rainy season is here more in earnest now to ensure that our labor and investment of inputs is not in vain.

From time to time we have visitors who come to learn and see what is happening at RAU.  It was our pleasure to have Shannon Albert with us for a week.  She is a missionary to the Dinka in South Sudan (near Aweil).  She came to receive some Ag training and ideas for new crops to try in her area where, she reports, production is limited to a few staples which have been around for centuries.  Shannon is hoping to multiply seed and introduce new crops to provide variety and added nutrition.  In addition to the knowledge and hands on practice, she took back with her yam and two types of beans as well as passion fruit seeds.  Her company was a blessing and Jacob and I were both impressed with her passion for the gospel as well as her tenacity to stay in what most people would consider a “hard place.

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This week we harvested our special variety Cassava (disease resistant and able to be harvested and eaten in 6 months time).  Our plan is to cut up and dry the Cassava tubers and then grind and mix with Millet for the famous “Kalo” which so many here love to eat. We also want to get the planting stock into the community.  Recently, Emma brought to our attention that meteorologists are predicting severe famine for north and northeastern regions of Uganda which will affect food sources. The rains came almost a month later than normal.  There is already an effect seen in the prices of certain commodities.  RAU’s plan is to use some of the mixture for our retreats, but also to store and provide in the event of famine.

This past week we welcomed some local visitors and representatives of our local Rendi Ke Chiefdom.  Here is what I wrote in a FaceBook post:

Friday was a very special day at RAU. We had a visit from some distinguished emissaries from the Rendi Ke Chiefdom (which comprises all of Moyo Sub-County and Moyo Town Council.) During a Cultural Gala held while we were away, the Chiefdom had awarded RAU a Certificate of Appreciation for its part in improving the livelihood of the area through our Agricultural Extension service (Demo Plot, weekly call-in Ag radio program, inputs, training sessions and one-on-one extension service). The visiting members came to give appreciation in person to the organization and to see, firsthand, some of the things being accomplished, to learn and take away some new ideas to share with their communities. Jacob said that they expressed a great interest in the spiritual training as well as some of the technical know-how of the buildings, including the septic system. While the Chief of Rendi Ke could not attend personally, he sent a hand-written letter to Jacob expressing his thanks.

Part of the overall plan has been “multiplication”: of knowledge, practices, seeds and improved varieties of inputs which have resulted in increased production and the inspiration to think of farming as a business rather than simply subsistence. This model is an outworking the principle found in 2 Timothy 2:2 which applies to farming as well as to the Biblical training offered at RAU: “Teaching faithful people who will, in turn, teach others to teach others.” In this way, knowledge will be passed on through generations as well as spread to a wider population of practitioners.

It was a lovely visit and an opportunity to give mutual appreciation for services rendered to the community. We sent them off with a ESV Global Study Bible, the Desiring God tract, “Search for Joy” in English and Ma’di, and a bag of some of the tasty mangoes we are growing here. A special thanks to Christopher Mundruku for arranging this event.

The focus of RAU’s ministry, whether Biblical/Pastoral training or Agriculture is prepare people for multiplying and expanding the reach of good things through multiplication.  It’s about preparing and being prepared and ready “in season and out of season” so when opportunities arise people are ready to rise up to those opportunities.  One of the tiers of the “Reaching and Teaching” modular education extension is comprised of refugees from (North) Sudan and a few from South Sudan.  These refugees have talked of their displacement in terms of being part of God’s design for them to get training before returning to their respective countries and communities.  In light of recent political events in the Republic of Sudan, citizens there have experienced a greater freedom of speech and worship.  The underground church has been able to “come out of hiding” to worship publicly for the first time.  RAU is taking advantage of this open door to get resources (Bibles, books and Kindles loaded with teachings as well as the Jesus Film) to pastors and leaders there.  How hopeful it is to simply get the word of God into places where it is difficult to find.

“The Word of God is like a lion. You don’t have to defend a lion. All you have to do is let the lion loose, and the lion will defend itself.”

~~Charles Spurgeon~~

At the end of March, we spent a Sunday at Aya Baptist church with several of the Metu Mountain churches plants (Alugodu, Ijujo, Cinyi and Oku).  It was exciting to see the progress on the church structure for the Aya Baptist members.  We have some wonderful friends in the USA who have wholeheartedly taken it upon themselves to partner with RAU and the congregation to see a structure built which will be a blessing for Sunday gatherings as well as other meetings and trainings.

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Aya Baptist, under the leadership of Pastor Ojji Tobious, is a beacon of light in the community.  Through this church, a number of churches have been planted in remote villages.  Aya Baptist has become a sending, church-planting church!  Jacob and I had the opportunity to meet personally with the leaders of these church plants and to listen to their struggles and encourage them. Our hearts broke for the difficulty of the task to which they have been called and for the discouragement they were feeling.  Few pastors in the USA (or even here in Uganda) would be willing to walk up and down mountain paths every week to shepherd fledgling believers in the faith who sometimes show up and sometimes don’t because they are out in their gardens or hunting for food. Pastors here must be bi-vocational to make ends meet for their families and there are few jobs available near their homes.  They rightfully feel the burden to provide for their families. Please pray for these men as they try to remain faithful to a most crucial calling while also remaining faithful in their own households.

Just as we made every effort to encourage and strengthen ours brothers in the Lord, so we encourage ourselves in times of weariness, loneliness and busyness.  What we are doing is not just “busy work” or “less than spiritual” or we would just as soon pack up and leave.  What we are doing, if we examine ourselves and adjust our motives and attitudes, is for the Lord and for the blessing of others and is in obedience to Jesus’ command to GO and make disciples of all nations.  Within that very spiritual directive fall all of the daily activities which can seem to be insignificant–inconsequential–in light of eternity, but, oh, so necessary!

As we have seen, this means that Christians cannot look down on labor involving more intimate contact with the material world. Caring for and cultivating this material world has worth, even if it means cutting the grass. This also means that “secular” work has no less dignity and nobility than the “sacred” work of ministry. We are both body and soul, and the biblical ideal of shalom includes both physical thriving as well as spiritual. “Food that nourishes, roofs that hold out the rain, shade that protects from the heat of the sun. . . . the satisfaction of the material needs and desires of men and women . . . when businesses produce material things that enhance the welfare of the community, they are engaged in work that matters to God.”

Keller, Timothy. Every Good Endeavor: Connecting Your Work to God’s Work (p. 52). Penguin Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.

As we prepare for a busy season of teaching retreats and outreaches, please pray with us the Lord’s blessing, wisdom, guidance, grace and provision:

  • Wednesday, April 24th, Jacob will be at the South Sudan Diocese Christian College here in Moyo presenting tools to assist the students in dialogue with and witnessing to Muslims.  He will be presenting them with the booklets that he created for that purpose.
  • May 10th: Jacob and Charles (and the youth of Pilgrim’s Church in Yumbe) will be conducting an evangelistic outreach in a marketplace within Yumbe District. Plans for more are in the docket.
  • June 16-27: Rocky Point team for Reaching and Teaching Module on Hermeneutics with (North) Sudan refugees.
  • July 12-24: Forest Hill Presbyterian team for Reaching and Teaching Module on Systematic Theology, Church History and Ordinances with (North) Sudan refugees.
  • Strategizing for evangelizing and new church plants in remote Metu Mountain villages along with on going discipleship
  • Continue to pray for Gospel efforts in the Republic of (North) Sudan and for a peaceful and peace-producing new government as well as a true cease-fire in South Sudan so re-settling can occur.
  • Thank you for your prayers and financial support! May God richly bless you!

Thank you and God Bless you,

Carol (Jacob) Lee

Go to RAU’s Facebook page for up to date reports, pictures, musings, and exhortations:
RAU was recently registered with Amazon as a non-profit organization to which a percentage may be donated for every dollar you spend there.  Here is the link if you are interested:
For those who have asked, small packages and letters may safely be sent to:
Jacob & Carol Lee, PO. 55, Moyo Uganda, East Africa
The greatest evil is having the gospel and not doing everything within our power to get it to those who do not have it!
 ———–
 When at least 35% of the world, “the unoccupied fields”, have no access to the gospel, we (believers) must all do all we can to reach them. We who are saved owe the gospel to every lost person, most especially the 2.4 billion who will not hear unless someone breaks into their “unoccupied field” with no thought of their own life!
 —————-
 Sowing seeds of love and kindness should not be separated from preaching the gospel of sovereign grace but completely intertwined with it!
 —————-
 I am sure that none of us will say when in heaven that we prayed too much, we sacrificed too much, proclaimed the gospel too much, and were too passionate to get the gospel to those who have little to no access to this gospel of grace. Let us together press on to make it our  ambition to preach the gospel where Christ has not been named!
—————
Our goal in our gospel witness is to take our eyes off the “risk” and place them on the cause for the risk. When God compels us like this he often will not tell us the risks…after all there are no risks for the all-knowing, all-powerful God. So let us be AMBITIOUS (Romans 15:20) to see that ALL are reached with the gospel of grace (Romans 1:16) in ALL places…there are no closed doors to the gospel, just some which are more difficult to go through!
 Jacob Lee
Tax deductible  charitable donations may  be made via PayPal or check.  PayPal also has a way to make reoccurring monthly gifts. Reoccurring monthly gifts are very helpful to the ministry. To do so, please click on the PayPal link below. PayPal deducts  a small amount from each gift as a processing fee. All gifts given through PayPal and by check are tax deductible as Reaching Africa’s Unreached has 501c3 tax exempt status as a charitable organization.  If you wish to write a check you may write it out to R.A.U.and mail it to Lifegate Missions, 395 Lifegate Ln., Seguin Texas 78155.

Pressing On!

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Scripture Union Youth group in Bidi Bidi refugee settlement receiving Bibles
We have been back to Reaching Africa’s Unreached several weeks now. We are very grateful for all your prayers and loving support. As Carol stated in our last newsletter, we enjoyed our visit back in the states with family and friends along with the opportunity to be in a number of churches. We were greatly encouraged and refreshed. Our only regret is that we did not get to see more of you, as well as spend more time with those of you with whom we were only briefly able to talk.
We landed safely in Entebbe with all our luggage full of ministry supplies: 18 tubs and two suitcases along with our four carry on’s. We first spent several days in Entebbe and Kampala taking care of business things. The tubs headed north on the bus and we took the one hour 15 minute flight from Entebbe to Arua in our favorite puddle jumper. In Arua, our friend Eric met us and drove us on the four-hour drive to Reaching Africa’s Unreached. We left the land Cruiser parked at RAU. Our first shock  being back was the intense, dry heat. We had seemingly been cold the whole time in the States and now we were in 100+ degree heat with our bedroom staying in the high 80’s up until early morning.
We have hit the ground running. One week after arriving (March 16th) Carol and I had the joy and honor to be at Emma and Vivian’s commitment as husband and wife before God, the church, and the community! The morning was spent in the church and the afternoon and early evening was in Emma’s ancestral home village, Opiru. It was a beautiful testimony of respect for culture, clans, and hospitality from family and community.
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​ Emma and Vivian’s joyous day!

Our major immediate push is to complete construction projects. It is looking like we will have the expansion of the Hall of Tyrannus completed this Monday or Tuesday. Our seating capacity will now easily accommodate 45, if need be.  We have trainings scheduled every month from May through December. The other on-campus building project is the mission house which, in effect, is a duplex and will hopefully be finished in mid April. We are believing and praying for like-minded, full time missionaries to join us. Please be praying with us for the connections we made while in the States which make us very hopeful that prayers are being answered.
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The other project which is being worked on is the Aya Baptist permanent church structure. Through the love and faithful gift of donors the walls are up. The next phase will be the roof. Aya is the central location for Metu Mountain church plants on the south side. With a permanent site we will be able to host multi-day trainings there for churches in this area where the population of believers is growing rapidly. Discipleship is key and RAU is called to come alongside the local church in support. On the Northern side of the Metu Mountains we have other church plants for whom we wish to do the same. The Arapi/Gbari Community Church is where we want to build a more permanent structure so that it, too, can be the center of the new churches in that area for discipleship like Aya. The slab is there and we praying for the funds to complete the structure. The smaller Metu Mountain village churches now have or are close to having simple bamboo church structures with metal roofs. These are necessary for keeping the rain and sun off people’s heads. Also in Obongi, there is also a simple church structure with an iron sheet roof. These small churches were previously meeting under trees or under tarps.
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We looking forward to seeing the four new wells (bore holes ) which were sunk in remote Metu Mountain villages while we were in the States. Now, because of the generous gifts of God’s people, nine bore holes have been drilled in the Metu Mountains and people are drinking from a clean water source for the first time. It is a great testimony of God’s love for them and they are all very appreciative. This year we hope to plant more churches in the Metu Mountains and drill more wells. Be praying for us in this!
On March 15th I made this post on Reaching Africa’s Facebook page:
 “One of my greatest joys is to be connected to men who have a passion to get God’s Word into some of the most challenging places. We had the joy of having Joshua Abraham and Absalah Kori with us for two days. Several times now, through them, we have been able to get  into the hands of church leaders Bibles and “loaded” Kindles in Darfur and Nuba Mountain states of the Republic of (North) Sudan as well as the nearby refugee encampments. Today we sent them off with 440 Bibles and 23 “loaded” Kindle Fires. Pray they all reach their destinations.”
 A big thank you to all Reaching Africa’s Unreached supporters! “
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Joshua Abraham from Darfur on the left and Absalah Kori who is working in Nuba Mountains on the right
TODAY I am happy to report that Kindle Fires and ESV Global Study Bibles have made it into the Nuba Mountains to church leaders, to students from Darfur, and, via Joshua Abraham, NASB ,ESV Study Bibles, and Kindle Fires have made it to nearby refugee encampments to church leaders and Scripture Union Youth groups.
The Principal of Kush Theological College is holding a Kindle Fire in the picture below. He writes, “We thank God for wonderful blessing RAU is doing among the Nuba Mountains pastors.”
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Principal of Kush Theological College
The Kindle Fires are loaded with both English and Arabic Bibles/resources as well the “Jesus” film in various appropriate languages.
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I add my thanks and appreciation to “Study To Be Approved” , “Global Works” and the many friends and churches who are faithfully supporting Reaching Africa’s Unreached. Together we are getting the Word of God to some of the most difficult places in the world as well as strengthening local church leaders! Thank you!!
With Gratefulness,
Jacob and Carol Lee
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All dressed up for Emma and Vivian’s day
RAU was recently registered with Amazon as a non-profit organization to which a percentage may be donated for every dollar you spend there.  Here is the link if you are interested:
For those who have asked, small packages and letters may safely be sent to:
Jacob & Carol Lee, PO. 55, Moyo Uganda, East Africa
The greatest evil is having the gospel and not doing everything within our power to get it to those who do not have it!
 ———–
 When at least 35% of the world, “the unoccupied fields”, have no access to the gospel, we (believers) must all do all we can to reach them. We who are saved owe the gospel to every lost person, most especially the 2.4 billion who will not hear unless someone breaks into their “unoccupied field” with no thought of their own life!
 —————-
 Sowing seeds of love and kindness should not be separated from preaching the gospel of sovereign grace but completely intertwined with it!
 —————-
 I am sure that none of us will say when in heaven that we prayed too much, we sacrificed too much, proclaimed the gospel too much, and were too passionate to get the gospel to those who have little to no access to this gospel of grace. Let us together press on to make it our  ambition to preach the gospel where Christ has not been named!
 Jacob Lee
Tax deductible  charitable donations may  be made via PayPal or check.  PayPal also has a way to make reoccurring monthly gifts. Reoccurring monthly gifts are very helpful to the ministry. To do so, please click on the PayPal link below. PayPal deducts  a small amount from each gift as a processing fee. All gifts given through PayPal and by check are tax deductible as Reaching Africa’s Unreached has 501c3 tax exempt status as a charitable organization.  If you wish to write a check you may write it out to R.A.U.and mail it to Lifegate Missions, 395 Lifegate Ln., Seguin Texas 78155.